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Lee Strobel to Teach at Houston Baptist University's School of Christian Thought

 
By Alex Murashko , Christian Post Reporter
 

Atheist-turned-Christian Lee Strobel, the former award-winning legal editor of The Chicago Tribune, has accepted a position as professor of Christian Thought at Houston Baptist University, it was announced Tuesday. Strobel told The Christian Post that he is excited to help equip students to make a difference for Jesus Christ.

"I'm excited about helping a new generation work through how we can naturally and effectively share the message of Jesus in the 21st century," Strobel told CP via email. "Our increasingly skeptical world presents special challenges as we seek to fulfill the Great Commission. HBU is assembling an impressive team to innovate new ways for Christians to bring God's message of redemption and hope to our neighbors, our nation and our world.

"I'm thrilled with the opportunity to encourage and equip these sharp young Christians to make a difference for Christ," he said.

Strobel, who is a New York Times best-selling author of more than 20 books, including The Case for Christ, will join the faculty of the Department of Apologetics in HBU's School of Christian Thought.

Read more: Lee Strobel to Teach at Houston Baptist University's School of Christian Thought

For Scouts, a Badge of Dishonor


After two decades of bitter back and forth, one of the last strongholds for morality in America finally buckled. Late this afternoon, despite a relentless push by Scouts in every state, the National Council exchanged a century-old legacy for a false compromise that puts an American tradition on the pathway to extinction. After 103 years of principled leadership, the organization proved that it was incapable of the same kind of courage it's been instilling in American boys since the beginning of the 1900s. By a lopsided vote, delegates ushered into the Boy Scouts a new era of moral compromise, allowing homosexual boys and turning against a majority of members in the process.

Read more: For Scouts, a Badge of Dishonor

Teach Them Why They Died So That We Might Live

By Jim Daly , CP Contributor
May 27, 2013|6:32 am

If you've heard it once, you've heard it said several hundred times:

It's difficult to raise a child these days.

There's the sliding culture to deal with, of course, and the loss of a unified Christian ethos, of a government attempting to force us to violate our conscience on numerous levels.

There are the practical demands of parenting, many of which seem more acute these days. Our neighborhoods don't feel as safe or secure as they did when we were kids. At the age of six, I was riding my bike everywhere without a care in the world, but today, we're reluctant to let our boys and girls peddle beyond our block.

Read more: Teach Them Why They Died So That We Might Live

Providential perspective

Thomas Lake is a Sports Illustrated senior writer. A recent Gospel Coalition article on him began, "It may surprise you to learn the finest young sportswriter-perhaps the finest young writer period-in America is a Christian."

Your mom and your dad, a pastor, homeschooled you and your five siblings-how did that prepare you for your job as a writer? It was pretty free-form. A lot of going to the library-the whole pack of us in the station wagon-and we would check out 40 or 50 books at a time and sit around reading them.

We had lesson plans for learning math and all that, but a lot of it was pursuing our intellectual curiosity, and that's what I get paid to do: Think of something I'm curious about, and go find out the rest of the story. It's a privilege to be able to do that.

Read more: Providential perspective

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